Tuesday, July 26, 2005

Crisis Communications - Five Questions To Ask Before You Leap In

How do you handle a crisis?

Here's five good questions to ask when responding to a crisis.

"Before you react, it is important that you properly analyse the situation so you can respond appropriately.

Here are five steps to remember the next time you are faced with a crisis situation:

1. Before you react, stop for five minutes and look at the situation. Does it warrant your immediate attention? Can someone else handle it more efficiently? Is there another priority that is more important?

2. Avoid making sudden accusations or pointing blame. Accusations and blame are counterproductive. Analyse what caused the crisis later, when the situation is resolved. Focus only on finding a reasonable solution.

3. Review past crises similar to the one you are faced with at the present and look for usable solutions. Keep a record of all crises and how you or other employees handled them.

4. Take charge of the situation. Tell your employees exactly what you want them to do. Give clear and precise instructions. Follow your organiation’s established procedures, policies and practices.

5. If possible, stay relatively uninvolved in the situation. Put your trust in your employees to handle the situation.

Do only what is necessary to extinguish the crisis. Avoid making sweeping changes in policies, responsibilities or employment during the crisis. Wait until things have cooled and the situation is resolved to make any major changes."

Source: LMA - The Leading Edge No7, Tuesday, 26 July 2005 5:21 PM

How Crisis Ready Are You?

New courses coming soon:

To ensure that your organization is truly crisis-ready and prepared, this program on advanced crisis management strategies will help you prepare for any potential crisis scenario. Learn how to deal with a major incident in a calm, planned and professional way.

At the end of this workshop participants will learn:

· The guiding principles to understand and live by in preparing for any crisis.
· Knowing the crisis rules versus actually testing your processes to be as prepared as possible.
· Leveraging your organization's current processes/rules to help you look smart and ready.
· Key tools and techniques you can walk away with to help you manage crises smarter.
· Examples of companies that have learned to be more crisis prepared.
· Testing messages during a crisis.
· Rebuilding confidence and trust among employees from a high level.
· Managing the issues and turning the matter from a crisis into solutions-oriented campaign.
· Communicating to stakeholders that your company can be trusted.

Outline:

1. What is a crisis?

· Definition and main characteristics.
· Causes and consequences.
· Examples – SARS, Tsunami, London bombings

2. Managing the Crisis

· Plans
· People
· Procedures.

3. Managing the Response

· Impact
· Information
· Timing

4. Managing the Message

· Understanding newsmakers
· Threats and Opportunities
· Communication actions: frequency, meaning and targets

5. Managing the Process

· Roles and responsibilities
· Support
· Evaluation

6. The Three Golden Rules

· Knowing your topic
· Being prepared
· Staying calm

7. Practical exercises

· Each participant takes part in a "hypothetical media crisis".
· They will take on the role as a spokesperson for a stakeholder group and build a case around this story.
· This will be used for the practical TV interview exercises.

8. Practical TV Interviews

· Putting it into practice
· Role play

9. Debrief & reflection

· Video playback
· Second by second evaluation and coaching
· Strengths analysis
· Weaknesses evaluation
· Action plan

Who Should Attend:
CEOs, Operations Managers, General Managers, PR and Marketing Professionals in Corporate Communications, Employee Communications, Financial/Investor Relations, Human Resources, Interactive PR, Investor Relations, Marketing Communications Marketing, Media Relations, New media, PR Firms, Public Relations, Public Affairs

For those in Singapore, here are the dates:

Course Title: Emergency and Crisis Communications Management
Dates: January 25th & 26th, July 26th & 27th, December 6th & 7th 2006
Duration: 2 Days
Time: 9am – 5pm
Facilitator: Mr Thomas Murrell MBA, CSP


Visit our website for the latest details.

Tuesday, July 19, 2005

Blogging Effectiveness

By Thomas Murrell MBA, CSP International Business Speaker

I'm always into measuring for effectiveness. How can you measure your blogging efforts.

Well, this is worth implementing in your business if you are a blogger.

Every so often I take a few minutes to do a quick Technorati or Feedster search for our company name or my own name. It's like doing a Google search on yourself, only in this case you discover what millions of bloggers are saying about you.

The benefit is you see where your articles, ideas and content are being picked up. A really great tool.

Want more great ideas on Internet Marketing? There are lots of resources and ideas at my site.

Monday, July 04, 2005

Effective Public Relations Writing: The Winner of Our Rewrite Competition

Effective Public Relations Writing: Our Rewrite Competition was to take this example put out by Tasmanian Liberal shadow treasurer Brett Whiteley in a press release issued on May 24, 2005 and highlighted in The Australian newspaper (June 2nd, 2005 page 20) and rewrite it.

"All State Liberal Policy pledges are official State Liberal policy, as are Policy Position Statements. All Policy Position Statements and Policy Pledges are fully costed. The only difference between our Policy Position Statements and Policy Pledges is that further detail associated with our Policy Pledges will be released at a later date. This detail will be released at the time of our choosing."

The winner is .....

Congratulations to Andrew Waugh, Networks Engineer Asset Management Section with Western Power Corporation in Perth who won the competition.

Here is his winning entry and the strategy behind it ....

"List the axioms:

[1] All State Liberal Policy pledges are official State Liberal policy.
[2] All Policy Position Statements are official State Liberal policy.
[3] All Policy Position Statements and Policy Pledges are fully costed.
[4] Further detail associated with our Policy Pledges will be released at a later date.
[5] Further detail associated with our Policy Pledges will be released at the time of our choosing.
[6] The further detail associated with our Policy Pledges is the only difference between our Policy Position Statements and Policy Pledges.

Assumption: A Policy Pledge becomes a Policy Position Statement, upon release of the (mysterious) further information.
Reason: The ONLY difference between the two is the release of further information per axiom [6]

Now we can perhaps re-write more concisely:

[7] = [1,2,3] All State Liberal policy pledges and position statements are fully costed and official.
[8] = [4,5,6] We shall release further information at a latter date of our choosing about our pledges, so as to describe our position statements fully.
[8] can be trimmed further as:
- Future tense “shall” automatically implies “at a latter date”
- “At a latter date of our choosing” is a default assumption that would be made if it were not stated to be due to any other reason.

The Final (somewhat more concise) Statement:

All State Liberal policy pledges and position statements are fully costed and official. We shall release further information about our pledges, to fully describe our position statements.

Yes, I am an engineer. Can you tell...? ;o)

p.s. Is "costed" an official word in the Macquarie (our national) Dictionary, or is this another example of our politicians making it up as they go...?

Here are the other entries:

"We have policies and quantities of documents associated with them. We think we know what we want to do, but we’re not sure what it’s going to cost. We’ll tell you when we’re good and ready!"
Terri Neuzerling, Manager, Employment Directions Centre, Northam

Ed comments: You win the humour award!

Tasmanian Liberals Stand by their Pledges
"We mean it, whether we say it or write it." said Tamanian Liberal shadow Treasurer Brett Whitley yesterday, in response to accusations by Labor politicians that neither State Liberal policy position statements nor their policy pledges could be relied upon. "They are all official and fully costed." he said. "We usually release the shorter policy pledges to the press and follow them up at a later stage with a detailed policy position statement. But we stand by them both. That's what sets us apart from the Labor Party."

Mark Butler

Ed comments; nice creative work Mark!

"State Liberal Policy pledges and Policy Position Statements are part of
official State Liberal Policy. Both are fully costed and further information
about our policy pledges will be released at a later date."

May Ng

Ed comments; nice and short, well done.

"All state Liberal policy pledges and position statements are fully
costed and are official state Liberal policy. We will release further
detail on our policy pledges at a later date."

Cuts more than 50% of the words out!
Christina Koullas
Corporate Communications Coordinator
Spirit of Tasmania, Melbourne

Ed comments; nice and short, well done.

"All State Liberal Policy Pledges and Policy Position Statements are official State Liberal policy and fully costed; however the details of Policy Pledges may be released later at a suitable time.

Cheers,

Henry Rymill
Big Sky PR, Kent Town Adelaide

Ed comments; nice and short, well done.

"All Policy Position Statement's & Pledges are official State Liberal Policies, and as such are all fully costed.

Further detail's relating to Policy Pledges will be released when deemed appropriate by the Liberal Party."

Regards
Andria Dickinson
Injury Management Co-ordinator
Austral Bricks, MIDLAND WA

Ed comments; nice and short, well done.

"All Policy Pledges and Policy Position Statements are official State Liberal
policy. Both Statements and Pledges are fully costed. Further detail about
Policy Pledges will be released at a later date to be advised."

Cheers,
Lee Howman

Ed comments; nice and short, well done.

"All State Liberal policies are fully costed and expressed in Pledges
and - with more detail - Position Statements. Pledges contain a
summary of policy which is released after further consultation and
discussion."

Regards

Simon Jackson

Well done to all our entrants.

Copy your effort on this blog if you think you can do better.

Cheers

Tom