Tuesday, April 27, 2010

Under 30 Years of Age and Want to Make it in Business?

What does it take to make it in business if you are under 30 years of age?

This is a great article from Smart Company:

"The businesses run by this group of rising entrepreneurs aged 30 years and under have more than $100 million in combined revenue. They employ well over 600 people. On average, their start up costs were under $100,000 and in most cases their companies have been in operation for less than five years.

And after breezing through the GFC, this group of young guns is looking to really ramp up their growth as the economy heads back towards top speed.

There were two main criteria for this year‘s list – entrepreneurs had to be 30 years or under and their business had to have at least $1 million in annual sales.

So how are they doing it? Here are 10 strategy secrets from the Hot 30:

Live to serve
As in the wider Australian economy, the clear trend from the list is the shift towards services – 18 of the 30 businesses on the list are service companies riding the outsourcing trend, typically in a very specific niche.

Leverage your tech edge
What sets these younger entrepreneurs apart is their ability to use technology in different ways to give themselves an edge by cutting out costs, connecting with customers and staff and delivering services faster and more cheaply.

Your idea doesn't need to be revolutionary
Many entrepreneurs think they need a completely original idea or a brilliant new product to succeed. Not true – simply delivering a better product or service than currently exists is enough to build a strong business.

Look overseas for great ideas
Getting ahead of the local market by looking overseas is not a guarantee of success, but it can provide a strong building block.

The younger you are, the less you've got to lose
Starting a business when you are young can be tough, particularly when you're trying to scrape together start up funds. But a number of entrepreneurs on the Hot 30 say this is also an advantage – the less you've got, the less you've got to lose.

Get advice – and plenty of it
Whether it is a mentor, a board or directors, an accountant, a legal adviser or an industry expert, soaking up as much advice as possible is crucial to success.

Hire well
Entrepreneurs of all ages will tell you that good staff are one of the most important ingredients for success. For young and less experienced business owners, this is especially true.

Fight to persuade suppliers to work with you
One of the biggest challenges the Hot 30 talk about is convincing suppliers that young entrepreneurs should be taken seriously. The experience of the Hot 30 shows that it doesn't get any easier, although success has a funny way of opening doors.

Systemise it
The explosive growth of a young business can be difficult for an entrepreneur to manage and the implementation of strong financial, HR and administrative systems is crucial to coping with grow.

Listen to the market
Perhaps it's their ability to tap into social networks or maybe it's just because they have grown up as big consumers of information. Whatever the case, the Hot 30 concentrate heavily on listening to customers and gathering market intelligence."

Source: The Hot 30 Under 30 - 30 entrepreneurs making more than $1 million a year, Media release APRIL 27, 2010.

Need help? Why not consider our mentor program. Contact us via our web.

Friday, April 23, 2010

Great Feedback For Essentials of Investor, Media and Stakeholder Relations Tuesday 13th April 2010, Chartered Secretaries Australia, Perth, Australia

One of the elements I love about this organisation is that they rigorously test and measure the effectiveness of all their seminars.

What a delight it was to get this quantitative feedback about the program:

100% of delegates rated knowledge of subject matter Excellent (highest rating)
100% of delegates rated practical application of the visuals and handouts Excellent (highest rating)
100% of delegates rated ability to answer questions Excellent (highest rating)
96% of delegates rated the speaker overall Excellent (highest rating)

Some qualitative feedback:

"Interactive presentation, flexibility and personal approach"
"Practical examples and sharing experiences"
"Tom was personable and very good at getting us back onto the topic. He has good chairperson skills"

"Feedback from this program was very positive, and both your content and presentation were rated highly from participants" Leigh Grant, Manager Western Australia

Why don't you consider hiring Tom to speak on Essentials of Investor, Media and Stakeholder Relations to your senior executives or Borad of your public company? Enquire here.

Thursday, April 22, 2010

How To Do 10 Presentations in 10 Days - Part Two

How To Do 10 Presentations in 10 Days - Part Two
By Thomas Murrell MBA, CSP International Business Speaker

This article is based on the premise: Visibility + Credibility = Profitability.

Giving a speech is one of the best ways of implementing this formula.

You may remember I set myself the personal goal of giving 10 presentations in 10 days and getting my name, face, brand and message in front of as many people as possible.

I also tried to give the speeches in as many different contexts as possible.

I also tried many different types of methodology - as a personal stretch.

By writing this article, I'm not trying to IMPRESS you, but EXPRESS to you that there are many ways to give a speech and lots of opportunities available.

Here are my second set of insights into what I did and how you can achieve the same success for your career, business and life.

6. Give a Breakfast Keynote to a Private Business Club Where You Are A Member

Day 6 - was to give a breakfast keynote Brands, Beliefs and the Bottomline as part of the Triple B Breakfast Series at the prestigious Western Australian Club where I am a member.
Methodology - Keynote.
Outcomes - Challenge and change the thinking of a small but influential group.
Key Learnings - leverage the marketing budget, channels and distribution of a business club. They included the event with photo and biography in their regular glossy magazine mailed to all members, in their electronic newsletter, on their website and on the screens at their venue. I even had a meeting with a prospect at the Club weeks prior to the event and my name and face was on the big TV screen and this was a point of conversation and a good first impression when I met them. What you need: Good structure, props and narrative. Lots of personal stories.
ACTION: Leverage the moment with a photograph of the most influential and prominent people in the audience. Follow-up with an article or podcast for those that couldn't make it!

7. Facilitate and Host a Forum

Day 7 - was to facilitate The Way Forward Forum at The University of Western Australia Business School, Crawley, Perth.
Methodology - Facilitate, act as MC, keep the event running smoothly, ensure a process for engagement and input for all audience members.
Outcomes - Application of information into a framework and what it means in the context of the audience.
Key Learnings - Focus on a Process that facilitates Capturing & Building Ideas. Allow Space & time to facilitate discussion.
ACTION: Use tried and tested facilitation skills such as breaking into groups, setting tasks within a framework, reporting back and using expert panel for feedback. Make sure you capture the moment and gather a testimonial (see my earlier blog post). Use LinkedIn as a simple way to capture and share testimonials.

8. Present a 1-minute Pitch To A Regular Breakfast Networking Group such as Business Network International (BNI)

Day 8 - was to give a one minute speech to a regular networking group I'm a member of.
Methodology - Elevator sales pitch in concise format
Outcomes - Because you deliver to this group every week - make it different each week. Use concrete examples and highlight your point of difference compared to competitors. Have a strong call to action at the end.
Key Learnings - spend the time preparing.
ACTION: There is an extra buzz when you go to a breakfast meeting with your bags packed, finish a speech, then jump in a cab and go straight to the airport to fly to your next speaking enagagement.

9. Run a Seminar for An Industry Association But in a Different Location

Day 9 - was to run a repeat half day workshop for an Industry Association but in Sydney instead of Perth
Methodology - Seminar Style Training
Outcomes - Skills transfer to small group
Key Learnings - leverage off the existing database and relationship the industry organisation has with its members. What you need: Exceptional content, outstanding delivery, take away materials and a strong personal brand in the marketplace. Remember the industry association is risking their reputation and relationship with their members based on your abilities. You better be good. Get good by practising on more forgiving audiences such as Rotary before you take the risk with Industry Associations. Do some shorter "teaser" presentations to build visibility and write some articles for their newsletter to get known and create interest.
ACTION: What industry associations are you a member of where you could give a speech? This is true leverage - you have already developed the content and delivered the program and ironed out any wrinkles. Now is the time to capitalise on all that time and effort by leveraging the relationship with the organisation by delivering to their membership in a different geographical location.

10. Give a Speech At A Family Celebration

Day 10 - OK, I'll spill the beans and confess I was asked to give a speech at my brother's 50th Birthday in Sydney.
Methodology - Humour/War Stories (eg memorable moments in brother/brother relationship), Light & Sweet, Witty & Charming Complementary to Birthday theme, high emotional story engagement, strong structure, celebration, honour and mention the important relationships - spouse, children and significant others. Go with the moment. Keep it short because alcohol was being served. Smile. High energy. Memorise structure and stories and deliver without notes.
Outcomes - Overwhelming response. Hey, my big brother gave me a genuine giant hug straight afterwards and many in the audience had a tear in their eye.
Key Learnings - this is one of the most difficult speeches to give. I had to manage my personal energy levels because I had given nine speeches in a row. Avoid drinking alcohol, exercise, eat well. Get to know the MC, the mike and the venue layout. Have a running sheet and the order of events and who else may be speaking. It is easier to give a speech to a group of strangers because higher expectations from all family members because of emotion involved. At the end of the day be genuine and authentic and enjoy the moment!

Please consider our next speechwriting and speechbuilding course on May 4th 2010 in Subiaco, Perth. Book here.

Wednesday, April 21, 2010

Wednesday, April 14, 2010

2010 Media Trend Predictions Come True

You may remember my article “Top 10 Media Trends for 2010” Wednesday, March 03 2010, where I predicted Fetch TV would be delivered via smaller internet providers.

One of my delegates at the recent Essentials of Investor, Media and Stakeholder Relations seminar on April 13th in Perth for Company Secretaries Association, Chris Brown, Company Secretariat for iinet updated me on their latest ASX Announcement, Media Release and media coverage.

It is interesting to compare - 1. ASX Announcement - simple, concise and compliant

IinetASXAnn

2. With media release - more detail, hype and quotes,

IInetpressrelease

3. With the final media coverage - range of angles, sizes and photos.

Iinetmediacoverage


Lessons learnt - it is worth the extra effort, time and money to turn an ASX Announcement into a media release.

Monday, April 12, 2010

Margie Baldock from Alchemy interviews Tom Murrell


Thomas Murrell was interviewed by Margie Baldock in the studios of the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) - pictured. The Alchemy Interviews are available at the Alchemy Masters Members Only website but I have been given permission for you to listen to this interview.

It will take 1 hour, 13 minutes, 6 seconds to listen to.




Click here to download…

Friday, April 09, 2010

Professional Facilitator Tuesday 16th March 2010, "The Way Forward Forum" The University of Western Australia Business School, Crawley, Perth


Pictured with (from left to Right: Angus Jaffrey, Boston Consulting Group, Tracy Deveugle-Frink, Graduate Management Association, Professor Renu Burr, University of Western Australia Business School




Client Testimonial: Tracy Deveugle-Frink, Event organiser, Graduate Management Association:
“I worked with Thomas in facilitating a debate at the UWA Business School and found him to be professional, intelligent, and talented. He was a great asset to the evening and aided us in keeping everyone engaged, energized and moving forward in one direction; no small feat in a debate! I would be please to recommend Thomas in this role to anyone and look forward to working with him again in the future.” March 16, 2010

Thursday, April 08, 2010

How To Do 10 Presentations in 10 Days - Part One

How To Do 10 Presentations in 10 Days - Part One
By Thomas Murrell MBA, CSP International Business Speaker

I'm a big fan of the formula: Visibility + Credibility = Profitability.

Giving a speech is one of the best ways of implementing this formula.

I set myself the personal goal of giving 10 presentations in 10 days and getting my name, face, brand and message in front of as many people as possible.

I also tried to give the speeches in as many different contexts as possible.

I also tried many different types of methodology - as a personal stretch.

By writing this article, I'm not trying to IMPRESS you, but EXPRESS to you that there are many ways to give a speech and lots of opportunities available.

Here are my insights into what I did and how you can achieve the same success for your career, business and life.

1. Run a Public Workshop

Day 1 - was to run a half day Master Class on Writing and Pitching Winning Media Releases.
Methodology - Seminar Style Training.
Outcomes - Skills transfer to small group.
Key Learnings - to run a public workshop on your own is an easy way to get in front of an audience. What you need: Good venue, catering, good content, value for money, take away materials and a distribution list to market to. I've been running public seminars for the past 12 years. The hardest step - deciding to run the first one!
ACTION: What topic could you run a public workshop on and do you have a database to market to?

2. Give A Celebration Speech

Day 2 - was to give a five minute speech at a graduation ceremony for MBA and Masters Graduates from the University of Western Australia Business School. Large and influential audience. Pressure to perform - high expectations from audience (especially those graduating and event organisers)!
Methodology - Motivational/Inspirational/Celebration Keynote
Outcomes - Recognise and acknowledge the hard work, achievements and success of graduates.
Key Learnings - giving a five-minute speech is the hardest in terms of duration. It is easier to present for two-days compared to five minutes. Every word has to count.
ACTION: Use relevant and meaningful personal stories (because I've been there before as an MBA graduate) to build emotional connection with the audience. Structure is critical! Be positive and upbeat - smile a lot and enjoy the moment. It is about the audience not the speaker.

3. Run a Seminar for An Industry Association

Day 3 - was to run a half day workshop for an Industry Association
Methodology - Seminar Style Training
Outcomes - Skills transfer to small group
Key Learnings - leverage off the existing database and relationship the industry organisation has with its members. What you need: Exceptional content, outstanding delivery, take away materials and a strong personal brand in the marketplace. Remember the industry association is risking their reputation and relationship with their members based on your abilities. You better be good. Get good by practising on more forgiving audiences such as Rotary before you take the risk with Industry Associations. Do some shorter "teaser" presentations to build visibility and write some articles for their newsletter to get known and create interest.
ACTION: What industry associations are you a member of where you could give a speech?

4. Present To A Not for Profit Group

Day 4 - was to give a ten minute speech at the AGM of a not for profit group I've just become Chairman of.
Methodology - Motivational/Inspirational/Forward looking Keynote
Outcomes - Recognise and acknowledge the hard work, achievements and success of the previous Chair and other volunteer committee members. Present outcomes from Board's strategic planning process and way forward.
Key Learnings - giving a ten-minute speech is still a challenge in terms of duration.
ACTION: Structure is critical! Be warm and friendly. Strong opening and closing. Clear call to action.

5. Be Part of An Industry Panel

Day 5 - was to give a five minute scene setting speech at an industry panel and then take part in a moderated panel forum discussion.
Methodology - Good panellists need to be Thought Provoking/Opinionated/Bounce Off Other Panel Members
Outcomes - Research and deliver three key industry trends that relate to theme of panel discussion. Use concrete case studies, facts and research to back up views.
Key Learnings - being a panellist involves less effort and stress than giving a speech. High impact and high return on investment for effort.
ACTION: Build content expertise and profile so event managers putting together panel discussions consider you as a "thought leader". Make sure you capture the moment and gather a testimonial (see The Buzz section below). Use LinkedIn as a simple way to capture and share testimonials.
Note to self: I'd forgotten how much fun it is to be a panellist, I should do more of these.

In the next edition, How To Do 10 Presentations in 10 Days - Part Two

Wednesday, April 07, 2010

CFO Gateway Seminar Series Continuous Disclosure and Managing Broker Communications


Monday 15th March 2010, The Institute of Chartered Accountants, Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu, 240 St Georges Tce, Perth
CFO Gateway Seminar Series Continuous Disclosure and Managing Broker Communications

Pictured with panellists (from left to right) Gary Arcus, State Manager The Institute of Chartered Accountants, Stefan Pfeifle, Senior Lawyer ASIC, Peter Rupp, Partner Deloitte, Ashok Desai, Managing Director Henley Securities, Paul Evans, CFO Imdex.

Tstimonial from client: Top qualities: Great Results, Personable, Creative

“Tom is an excellent business speaker and recently spoke as a panelist at one of our CFO events. Tom's ability to think outside of the box, combined with his considerable presentation skills made him an excellent asset. We are looking forward to continuing our relationship with him in the future.” March 25, 2010
Brian Martin
Relationship Manager, Business Solutions
The Institute of Chartered Accountants in Australia
BGC Centre, 28 The Esplanade

Thursday, April 01, 2010

Innovation with John Jacob

Listen to this interview with John Jacob, an expert on innovation.

He was a delegate at my media training workshop recently and is in my mentor program. Listen for the countdown, the way the media uses the camera as a notebook by getting him to state his name and title and watch for the use of key phrases and concrete examples to explain a complex topic like innovation.